An intro to blockchain and the technology that’s powering Web3 | Brave Browser (2022)

Today, most websites, apps, and other online services (e.g. streaming platforms like Netflix) are hosted on servers that are owned or rented by big corporations. Think of servers as the physical location where an app or website “lives.” When a company that provides a web service is responsible for its own servers, we refer to that as “centralized.”

That means, for example, that Netflix has servers in a warehouse somewhere that are whirring away so you can stream your favorite shows. When you log in to Netflix to stream a show, your device (your phone, tablet, or computer) communicates with those servers, sending data back and forth. Ultimately, Netflix has complete control over those servers. Netflix alone chooses what content is added to the platform, what streaming speeds are supported, and who can access their servers and how.

There’s nothing too out of the ordinary here because pretty much everything that’s currently on the internet works this same way. This model of the internet with centralized ownership is referred to as “Web 2.0.” Web3, however, is different. It’s the decentralized Web, and it aims to do things a bit differently—especially when it comes to servers and how you access things online.

For example, you’ll typically log in to online services on Web 2.0 (again, like Netflix) with a username and password, or with an authentication service like “Sign in with Google.” On Web3 you really only need one username and password for everything. Sounds nice, right?

The decentralized web is made possible thanks to several new technologies, which replace older, Web 2.0 tech like centralized servers and logins. These new technologies are:

  • Blockchains
  • Nodes
  • Cryptocurrency
  • Crypto wallets

If any (or all) of this sounds new and weird, don’t worry. In this article, we’ll define some of these core terms, and scratch the surface of decentralized technologies, what they can do, and how they work in Web3.

What is blockchain technology?

A blockchain network is a revolutionary new type of network that’s capable of being decentralized. With blockchain, it’s possible for a website or app to “live” across many different servers—with each one being independently owned and operated so that no individual or company retains complete control over the network. Blockchain is what makes the new Web3 model possible.

At its core, a blockchain is made up of many individual computers or servers that maintain one shared record of data, despite being remotely located all over the world. This shared record is commonly referred to as a “ledger,” and it functions much like a traditional ledger used in accounting. The data on these shared ledgers could be anything, but it’s most commonly a record of cryptocurrency transactions (more on that later).

The data is grouped together into “blocks” and strung together sequentially like a chain (where each link supports the next). As new blocks of data are processed, they’re appended to the end of the chain. Each block of data is crucial to the integrity of the overall chain—if one were to “break,” it would disrupt the entire chain.

(Video) Presentation: What is Powering Web3? Intro to Blockchains, Cryptocurrencies, and NFTs

Once a set of transactions are grouped together into a block, the sum of all that data goes through a cryptographic method called “hashing,” where all of the inputs (transactions) produce one unique output (the transaction ID hash). This transaction ID hash is a hexadecimal value (that just means 0–9 or a–f) that people can use to verify any given block is valid. If someone tried to manipulate even the smallest piece of a block’s transaction data, or add a false transaction, the block’s transaction ID hash would also become altered, other network participants would recognize it, and the entire block would get rejected.

Learn more about the basics of blockchain technology.

Where do new blocks in a chain come from?

New blocks come from people interacting with a blockchain network. Most often this means trading crypto, buying NFTs, or playing Web3 games, but really it could be anything. What matters isn’t so much the activity, but the basics of what’s happening beneath it: users trying to complete transactions on the blockchain results in new blocks needing to be added to the ledger.

Crucially, there is no company, IT guy, or CEO that exercises control over a blockchain. Instead, individual network participants (each user who stores a copy of the shared ledger of data) must come together as peers to reach consensus about the state of the network. The state of the network includes things like who owns which assets, and who sent cryptocurrency to who.

In the world of blockchain, we refer to these network participants as “nodes”—they’re essentially the individual computers connecting to the blockchain network. They must communicate with one another about new transactions, or blocks of data, and verify their authenticity. Then they must work together to add new blocks to the blockchain.

How do nodes add new blocks to the blockchain?

Given that each of the thousands of nodes that make up a blockchain network are operated by individual people, coming to agreement is no small feat. You can imagine that one of them may get greedy and be tempted to try to sneak an extra payout to themselves into a block of transactions. What happens then?

To facilitate the process of adding new blocks and keeping nodes honest, blockchains rely on “consensus mechanisms.” These are carefully devised frameworks and sets of rules for settling disputes and making sure that only valid transactions get approved. The original blockchain consensus mechanism was pioneered by the Bitcoin network, and it’s called Proof of Work (PoW).

Under PoW, one node is chosen to compile all the most recent transactions into a block and add it to the chain. Nodes compete against each other for this privilege by participating in a numerical puzzle; the first to solve it gets to “mine” the block, compiling its transactions and ensuring all the data is authentic. Then they broadcast the block to the rest of the network nodes, asking them to verify it. In traditional PoW blockchains like Bitcoin, 51% of network nodes need to agree that a block is valid before it gets added to the chain.

(Video) Learn Blockchain, Solidity, and Full Stack Web3 Development with JavaScript – 32-Hour Course

(Note: Though PoW came first, today there are numerous other consensus mechanisms—with different designs—that do things like produce blocks more quickly, decrease transaction fees, and more.)

How to ensure blocks are authentic

If a node broadcasts a block with manipulated transactions, it will be obvious to the other nodes, who will reject the block. A large population of nodes participates to decentralize the network, and these nodes are financially incentivized to maintain the integrity of the chain. While a handful of nodes might try to confirm manipulated transactions, it’s almost impossible that 51% of them will do so. (This is especially true on widely-used, reputable chains like Bitcoin or Ethereum; with blockchain, the more network participants there are, the more decentralized the network becomes, and the more difficult it is to manipulate the chain.)

Contrast this with traditional finance where only one node operated by a bank (the bank’s central server) needs to be manipulated rather than thousands of independent nodes (as you find in blockchain). You can see how much more secure a shared ledger can be than a central database.

As long as the majority of nodes are good actors, then a blockchain is safe from this type of manipulation. In fact, blockchain networks tend to be much more insulated from manipulation than traditional, centrally managed databases that operate behind closed doors.

There’s also a financial element to incentivize honest behavior from nodes. Blockchains issue different types of “block rewards”—monetary compensation in the form of the chain’s associated cryptocurrency—to the node that successfully adds a new block. If a node behaves honestly, they stand to earn the block reward. If their block is rejected because they lied or included false data, then they lose out on the funds and may be flagged as a potentially bad actor. Honest nodes may begin to reject or ignore data broadcasted from nodes that prove to be malicious.

With a secure network structure, a proper consensus mechanism, and high network participation, blockchains are capable of something that’s never before been possible online: the ability to create transparent decentralized networks. Any user with a computer and internet access can audit the entire history of network transactions. Rather than trusting an opaque central authority, blockchains enable a trustless decentralized network.

What does blockchain have to do with Web3?

As you’ve seen, blockchain is a novel system for generating consensus among network participants without a governing authority. Web3, meanwhile, is the decentralized web—where apps, online services, even finance—no longer need a centralized authority. How do they work together? Basically, blockchain technology facilitates the decentralization that Web3 needs.

Contrast this with Web 2.0.

(Video) Peer and Coinstack Webinar: Understanding Web3 Social Networks & The Metaverse

In Web 2.0, everyone’s computer connects to a company’s central servers—say, Wells Fargo, or Facebook—to log in and do stuff. In Web3, blockchain networks become the replacement for traditional, centrally managed databases and applications that gate users’ access to content, and store and manage their data.

With blockchain, users no longer create a username and password on a centralized server that a central authority could lock them out of, shut down, or limit access to. Instead, users connect to sites and applications that have some or all of their components hosted on blockchain networks—making them partially or fully decentralized. These decentralized apps and sites on Web3 are often called “DApps.”

Users rely on crypto wallets (which we’ll explain shortly) in order to do things like validate their access to DApps, complete cryptocurrency transactions, post on some new Web3 social media platforms, or do nearly anything else on Web3. And all of this needs blockchain technology to run.

What’s cryptocurrency, and how is it used in Web3?

Earlier, we mentioned the need to align the incentives of independent blockchain network participants, or nodes, so that they can reach consensus about the network. This is where cryptocurrency comes into play.

Cryptocurrencies are digital assets that are linked to particular blockchain networks. Each blockchain typically has one cryptocurrency that is natively integrated with the network and its consensus mechanism. The Bitcoin network has bitcoin (BTC), the Ethereum network has ether (ETH), and so on.

These are the cryptocurrencies that make up the “block rewards” given out to nodes for adding or validating new blocks on the chain—basically the financial incentive for nodes to do their job well. Without crypto, node operators would have no reason to support blockchain networks other than their own good will.

With these native cryptocurrencies that represent digital value, blockchain networks are able to use consensus mechanisms to facilitate network operations like transferring assets or adding and validating new blocks. For example, sending bitcoin from one person to another will incur a transaction fee (sometimes called a “gas fee”) for using network resources like electricity and computing power.

Those transactions, batched into blocks, are added to the shared ledger by network nodes. Nodes are, in turn, compensated with cryptocurrency for their participation in the network.

(Video) A Practical Take on Web3 with John Mosesman - OKC WebDevs

Crypto wallets: store assets and connect to Web3

With all this crypto being exchanged to facilitate the operation of decentralized networks, people need a way to store their assets. Crypto wallets are designed to do just that. A crypto wallet is a way for Web3 users to store crypto, transfer it to others, pay transaction fees, and more.

Basically, if you’re interacting with Web3, you need a crypto wallet to do so. Why? Because Web3 relies on blockchain networks, blockchains rely on cryptocurrency to facilitate operations, and cryptocurrency needs crypto wallets to be stored in, sent from, and transacted with. Crypto wallets are like your passport to Web3. The only difference is that, unlike a travel passport, crypto wallets don’t have any central authority—like a government—managing them.

How do crypto wallets enable you to sign on to an app or website on Web3?

Crypto wallets use private keys to access public “addresses” that can replace traditional login credentials.

For example, a typical blockchain public address might look something like this:

 0x634790328Ab021cA1E9Cf80457E8f8eFc5E8bA79

That address is a unique wallet identifier. Think of it like a username. Now, when visiting an app or website on Web3, you’ll be asked to connect your wallet. To do so, you’ll need both your wallet address and your private key—sort of like a password—to authorize the connection.

What’s different here is that, while in the Web 2.0 world usernames and passwords only grant you access to one app, a wallet address and private key will grant you access to any app or website on Web3. They’re all integrated with blockchain, cryptocurrency, and crypto wallets, so your wallet address can be used in place of an email address and password, which may help to keep you pseudonymous to those supporting services.

That’s the beauty of decentralization: it’s built into the core of how people interact with Web3.

The foundations of Web3

Blockchain and cryptocurrency aren’t some weird, tangential part of the Web3 movement. They’re integral parts of the decentralization that makes Web3 possible. They’re the core ingredients of the whole system.

(Video) Introduction to Web 3 - Tony Aube at WAQ19

Without cryptocurrency, blockchains lack the incentive mechanism for network participation. Without crypto wallets, users would have no place to store that cryptocurrency (or any sort of passport to access Web3). And without blockchain networks, Web3 couldn’t exist.

All these technologies come together to enable the decentralized version of the internet, this new thing called Web3. And the Brave Browser—with its built-in crypto wallet and native tie to the Basic Attention Token (BAT)—offers a secure and speedy gateway to connect to Web3 and start exploring.

FAQs

What is Web3 and blockchain? ›

Web3 (also known as Web 3.0) is an idea for a new iteration of the World Wide Web which incorporates concepts such as decentralization, blockchain technologies, and token-based economics.

What are the 3 technologies that form blockchain? ›

Decentralization, Transparency, and Immutability are the 3 main pillars of blockchain technology.

What is a Web3 browser? ›

A web3 browser is a web browser that opens up the users to a completely different world of digital economies and decentralized applications. They are important for people that work, invest, or use bitcoins and other digital currency. It takes power away from centralized applications.

Is Web 3.0 built on blockchain? ›

With blockchain at its core, Web 3.0 makes it possible for an expanding range of new apps and services, such as the following: NFT: Non-fungible Tokens (NFTs) are tokens that are individually unique and are kept in a blockchain with a cryptographic hash.

How do I start learning Web3? ›

Learn Web3 With These Free Resources (Updated September 2022)
  1. Get started Building Web3 Apps with Cloudflare. ...
  2. ETHEREUM DEVELOPMENT TUTORIALS. ...
  3. 2.3 Create your own Blockchain ERC20 Token | Python, Brownie, Solidity. ...
  4. 2.4 Scaffold-ETH - Simple NFT Example. ...
  5. 2.5 UNISWAP-V2 CONTRACT WALK-THROUGH. ...
  6. Buildspace. ...
  7. Crypto Zombies.

What is the best Web3 Crypto? ›

Here we have listed the top 10 cryptocurrencies that will compete with each other in 2023.
  • Tether (USDT) ...
  • BitTorrent (BTT) ...
  • Kadena (KDA) ...
  • ZCash (ZEC) ...
  • Flux (FLUX) ...
  • Livepeer (LPT) ...
  • Ocean Protocol (OCEAN) OCEAN is another crypto that offers all the tools needed to build a Web3 solution. ...
  • More Trending Stories.
4 Aug 2022

Who is the biggest blockchain company? ›

#1 Coinbase Global Inc.

Coinbase Global is a global provider of financial infrastructure, including transaction services, and technology designed for the crypto economy. The company's platform enables its retail users to invest, spend, save, earn, and use cryptocurrencies.

Who owns the blockchain technology? ›

To put it succinctly, nobody owns blockchain technology, and yet, everybody owns it. That is one of the unique features of blockchain tech, and this collective ownership and accountability is what makes blockchains very secure and immutable.

What is blockchain beginner? ›

Blockchain technology is a structure that stores transactional records, also known as the block, of the public in several databases, known as the “chain,” in a network connected through peer-to-peer nodes. This storage is referred to as a 'digital ledger.

What is Web 3.0 and its examples? ›

What are some of the examples of web 3.0? Wolfram Alpha and Apple's Siri are two examples of web 3.0 applications. Siri uses speech recognition techniques and artificial intelligence to search and deliver results.

Is Chrome a Web 3? ›

Many of the web2 browsers such as Firefox, Chrome, and Safari help you access web 3.0 applications easily. However, you would need a web3 wallet for accessing dApps through a regular browser.

What companies are Web3? ›

Top Web3 Companies - Sep 2022
RankCompany NameJobs Count
1Binance1067
2Crypto.Com660
3Ripple587
4Coinbase480
88 more rows

Is Web3 a metaverse? ›

Web3 is about decentralized ownership and control and putting the web in the hands of its users and the community. The metaverse, on the other hand, is a shared digital reality that enables users to connect with each other, build economies and interact in real time -- and it doesn't care who owns it.

How do you invest in Web3? ›

If you are planning to invest in Web3 passively, here are a few types you can try your hand at.
  1. Cryptocurrencies - The Talk of the Town!
  2. Platforms for Lending Crypto.
  3. Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs)
  4. Earn Money On Web3 By Airdrops.
  5. Crypto Mining.
  6. The Play To Earn Model.
8 Sept 2022

What skills should I learn for Web3? ›

Skills to secure entry level web3 jobs
  • Brush up on Blockchain basics & Ethereum. ...
  • Learn Solidity. ...
  • Write smart contracts. ...
  • Learn front-end web development. ...
  • How to connect front-end to your smart contracts.
20 Jul 2022

What language is used in Web3? ›

Web3 is basically a connection between the Ethereum blockchain and your smart contract. Behind the scenes, Web3 uses JSON RPC. RPC is used in many different types of programming languages. You can learn more about JSON RPC here.

How much do Web3 developers make? ›

The average Web3 developer salary is $100k - $140k per year. The salary is depends on the technology, programming language, years of experience, location and the seniority.

What are Web3 coins? ›

Web 3.0 cryptocurrencies are decentralized projects that use smart contracts and automate transactions over the internet.

Which metaverse coin is best? ›

According to many experts, Axie Infinity is one of the best metaverse cryptos in 2022. After the launch in 2020, the price of one AXS, the native token of this game, was $0.15 per token. In November 2021, the cost of this token was around $165, which means that AXS recorded a growth of almost 110.000%!

Why Web3 is the future? ›

Web3 can gain a lot of traction in the future with play-to-earn gaming. The massive surge in popularity of play-to-earn games such as Axie Infinity has shown the way forward for web3 gaming platforms. Decentralized storytelling would also emerge as one of the significant use cases of web3 in the future.

Which country is best for blockchain? ›

We may say that Zug makes Switzerland the best country for crypto.

Which coin has its own blockchain? ›

1. Bitcoin. Bitcoin is regarded as the first decentralized cryptocurrency using blockchain technology to facilitate payments and digital transactions.

Does Amazon use blockchain? ›

“With Amazon Managed Blockchain, we are able to set up our Hyperledger Fabric network and easily invite our partners to collaborate in our supply chain transparency efforts. Amazon Managed Blockchain will enable our customers to track their products on the blockchain from the farm all the way through to consumption.”

Can blockchain be hacked? ›

The concepts behind blockchain technology make it nearly impossible to hack into a blockchain. However, there are weaknesses outside of the blockchain that create opportunities for thieves. Hackers can gain access to cryptocurrency owners' cryptocurrency wallets and exchange accounts to steal crypto.

How can I learn Blockchain technology? ›

edX offers numerous blockchain tutorials and classes for people of different skill levels. If you are just starting to learn about it, The University of Berkeley offers a program called Blockchain fundamentals where you will learn core topics in cryptocurrency, including Bitcoin, and blockchain technology.

Which blockchain is best? ›

Top 6 Blockchain Platforms
  • Ethereum.
  • Kaleido.
  • Azure Blockchain Workbench.
  • IBM Blockchain Platform.
  • Corda.
  • Hyperledger.
21 Jul 2022

How many Blockchains are there in the world? ›

Today, there are more than 10,000 other cryptocurrency systems running on blockchain. But it turns out that blockchain is actually a reliable way of storing data about other types of transactions as well.

Which programming language is used in blockchain? ›

C++ is so popular for blockchain because of its multiple capabilities such as move semantics, primitive control over memory, advanced multi-threading, and other object-oriented features like function overloading, runtime polymorphism, etc.

Where do I start with blockchain? ›

You can begin this by joining various blockchain communities and visiting Bitcoin forums on Reddit, crypto vlogs on YouTube, and Blockchain news on Coindesk. Well, if you are ready to have some hands-on experience, you can do the same by buying some cryptocurrency and trading it. You can try Coinbase for the same.

How hard is it to learn blockchain? ›

Blockchain Development Is Not That Difficult to Learn

But the whole concept of blockchain development and design isn't as difficult as you might've thought. The skill even becomes easier to pick up once you have a web development background in languages like C, C++, Java, Python, NodeJS, and Go.

How do I learn blockchain for free? ›

7 Best Free Blockchain Courses and Certification for Beginners
  1. Blockchain Basics by University of Buffalo [Free Coursera Course] ...
  2. Enterprise Blockchain Fundamentals [Free Blockchain Crash Course] ...
  3. Blockchain Theory 101 [Free Udemy Course] ...
  4. The Complete Course On Understanding Blockchain Technology [Free]

How Web 3.0 will benefit our lives? ›

Web 3.0 allows for more interactivity between different users and websites. This means that users can access content from multiple sources at the same time, without having to leave the website they are on.

What are Web3 projects? ›

Web3 projects rely on the fundamentals and principles of blockchain technology. They are decentralized and permissionless. They don't require trust from the user or developer. They don't steal value but instead they reward for participation, development, and engagement.

What are some examples of Web 3.0 tools? ›

Some examples of web 3.0 applications
  • Bitcoin – The original cryptocurrency has been around for more than ten years, and the protocol itself is decentralized, although not all of its ecosystem is.
  • Diaspora – Non-profit, decentralized social network.
  • Steemit – Blockchain-based blogging and social platform.
24 Jan 2022

Are there decentralized browsers? ›

Osiris is a blockchain-based browser that emphasizes easy access to decentralized apps and acts as a link between different blockchains. It comes with all the basic functions, clean and easy-to-use interface, and focuses on privacy.

What is a blockchain browser? ›

Definition(s): A software for visualizing blocks, transactions, and blockchain network metrics (e.g., average transaction fees, hashrates, block size, block difficulty).

What enables Web3? ›

Web 3.0 architecture leverages what's enabled by a universal State Layer. It does this by allowing two things: Allowing applications to place some or all of their content and logic on to a public blockchain. Contrary to standard Web 2.0, this content and logic can become public and accessible by anyone.

Who is the leader of Web3? ›

Kapital DAO, The Leader in Web3 Gaming Asset Management Tech, Announces Funding Support From Web3 Leaders Including Polygon Ventures, Solana Foundation, and Algorand Foundation.

What are Web3 startups? ›

Web3 is a unique type of decentralized Internet ecosystem based on blockchain technology. This is a great time for Web3 startup companies to up their game and compete with popular Silicon Valley tech companies.

What are Web 3.0 startups? ›

What are web 3 Startups? The companies that uses decentralized internet/web are known as web 3 Startups. Web 3.0 makes use of machine learning, artificial intelligence, and blockchain.

Does Web3 have a future? ›

The future of the Metaverse will depend on stakeholders and how they build the future of Web3. The current form may look underpromising due to a lack of technological innovations, but industry leaders are sure that the Metaverse concept will take center stage in the next iteration of the internet.

How fast is Web3 growing? ›

The blockchain isn't just cryptocurrency, and Market Research Future says it's growing quickly. In 2023, the Web3. 0 blockchain technology sector will be worth more than six trillion dollars, according to Market Research Future, and Web3. 0 will continue to grow at a CAGR of 44.6% from 2023 to 2030.

How do I access metaverse? ›

To get started you can access Metaverse in your browser by going meta dot IO. Here it will first prompt you to set up your account. Once you have logged in, you can hit the get started button to get to your dashboard. There will be your dashboard of all the ones you have created or have copies of you highly recommend.

How can I make money from Web3? ›

7 Ways of Making Money With The Web 3.0
  1. Earn Money On Web3 by AirDrops. So the first way is through what is known as Airdrops. ...
  2. Play to Earn Model. The next way you can make a profit with web3. ...
  3. Earn From Your Data. ...
  4. Create Personalized Currency. ...
  5. Benefit Yourself From Decentralized Credit. ...
  6. Own NFTs. ...
  7. Participate In The Technology.

Who is the founder of Web3? ›

The term "Web3" was coined by Polkadot founder and Ethereum co-founder Gavin Wood in 2014, referring to a "decentralized online ecosystem based on blockchain." In 2021, the idea of Web3 gained popularity.

What is a hot wallet? ›

A hot wallet is a wallet that is always connected to the internet; they allow you to store, send, and receive tokens. Hot wallets are linked with public and private keys that help facilitate transactions and act as security measures.

What is Web3 example? ›

Examples of Web3 companies, platforms and networks

Popular Web3 networks include Ethereum, Solana, Polygon and Cosmos. Some popular Web3 platforms include OpenSea, Coinbase, Ledger and MetaMask. Many of these networks and platforms sell NFTs or cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin.

Is Web3 same as metaverse? ›

Web3 is about decentralized ownership and control and putting the web in the hands of its users and the community. The metaverse, on the other hand, is a shared digital reality that enables users to connect with each other, build economies and interact in real time -- and it doesn't care who owns it.

Is Web3 only Ethereum? ›

Web 3 is the next step of the Internet. It is currently still being built, so there is no single, established definition yet of what Web 3 is or will be. In general, however, Web 3 refers to an Internet that is made possible by decentralized networks, such as Bitcoin and Ethereum.

What is Web 3.0 and its examples? ›

What are some of the examples of web 3.0? Wolfram Alpha and Apple's Siri are two examples of web 3.0 applications. Siri uses speech recognition techniques and artificial intelligence to search and deliver results.

What companies are Web3? ›

Top Web3 Companies - Sep 2022
RankCompany NameJobs Count
1Binance1067
2Crypto.Com660
3Ripple587
4Coinbase480
88 more rows

How Web3 will change the world? ›

If you have an internet connection along with cryptocurrency wallets such as Metamask, you can connect to world of web3. As a result, users would receive full control of their digital identities alongside the methods and timing of sharing data by using different online applications.

How do you invest in Web3? ›

If you are planning to invest in Web3 passively, here are a few types you can try your hand at.
  1. Cryptocurrencies - The Talk of the Town!
  2. Platforms for Lending Crypto.
  3. Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs)
  4. Earn Money On Web3 By Airdrops.
  5. Crypto Mining.
  6. The Play To Earn Model.
8 Sept 2022

Does Web3 have a future? ›

The future of the Metaverse will depend on stakeholders and how they build the future of Web3. The current form may look underpromising due to a lack of technological innovations, but industry leaders are sure that the Metaverse concept will take center stage in the next iteration of the internet.

How do I access Metaverse? ›

To get started you can access Metaverse in your browser by going meta dot IO. Here it will first prompt you to set up your account. Once you have logged in, you can hit the get started button to get to your dashboard. There will be your dashboard of all the ones you have created or have copies of you highly recommend.

What is Web3 in layman's terms? ›

What is Web 3.0 (Web3)? Web 3.0 (Web3) is the third generation of the evolution of web technologies. The web, also known as the World Wide Web, is the foundational layer for how the internet is used, providing website and application services.

What are Web3 projects? ›

Web3 projects rely on the fundamentals and principles of blockchain technology. They are decentralized and permissionless. They don't require trust from the user or developer. They don't steal value but instead they reward for participation, development, and engagement.

What is a Web3 app? ›

Web3, in the context of Ethereum, refers to decentralized apps that run on the blockchain. These are apps that allow anyone to participate without monetising their personal data.

How Web 3.0 will benefit our lives? ›

Web 3.0 allows for more interactivity between different users and websites. This means that users can access content from multiple sources at the same time, without having to leave the website they are on.

What is blockchain technology and how does it work? ›

Blockchain is a record-keeping technology designed to make it impossible to hack the system or forge the data stored on it, thereby making it secure and immutable. It is a type of distributed ledger technology (DLT), a digital system for recording transactions and related data in multiple places at the same time.

Videos

1. Presearch - After Mainnet Overview, Node Rewards, & New NFT's
(Critical Complex Channel - Web3 research)
2. Web3 Course | #1 Blockchain basics + Metamask Tutorial
(ABTube)
3. Web 3.0 Tech Talk: The power of offchain
(NKN.ORG)
4. Using the blockchain to restore online privacy | Steve Shillingford | TEDxSaltLakeCity
(TEDx Talks)
5. Explore the Decentralized Web with Brave and Unstoppable Domains
(Unstoppable Domains)
6. Ep.1 - Create, Store and read wallet (private key) - Web3.UE Blockchain Tutorial in Unreal Engine 5
(AngeIV)

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